Sep 21

Okavango Tigerfish Week 3: 14 – 18 Sept 2014

Mike with a solid 9.5lb fish during an early morning session.

Mike with a solid 9.5lb fish during an early morning session.

Delayed flights, dodging potholes and donkeys during the late evening transfer on a dark road in Africa, and a  lost anchor early on the first day of fishing marked the start of an interesting 4 days on the water.  Mike and Peter had to spend their first night in Maun after a 10 hour flight delay. They caught an early morning transfer from Maun to meet up with the rest of their party consisting of Ken, Anton, Graham and Jem who were already in camp. With regards to the anchor…… I will not go into details about what went down. Thankfully the guests on board for the day had a good sense of humor and were very forgiving (after quick and somewhat painful ‘straf dop’ that evening in camp).

TF Guide Kyle on a mission to find tigers with Mike and Pete

TF Guide Kyle on a mission to find tigers with Mike and Pete

 

After my rocky start, I was not going to except defeat so easily and after some deliberation with senior guides, Kyle and Lionel, decided to change my tactics to suite the changing conditions.  The runs were gathering momentum with thousands of catfish pushing on upstream, however the tigers did not show up in their usual numbers, and we were made to work for the fish that came to hand.  The curse on my boat was lifted and my mojo restored after Mike landed the first double figure tigerfish of the season. A super 10 lb fish that devoured  a black SF brush fly on Mike’s very first cast on the 3rd day.

Graham, landed this 12.5lb fish to take the biggest fish of the week honours

Graham, landed this 12.5lb fish to take the biggest fish of the week honours

Not long after that Graham, using a flick-stick and tiger jig, landed a beast of a tigerfish weighing in at 12.5 lbs.  After a few more tigers were landed,  Mike also got his first three-spot bream on fly. A superb fish which we all thoroughly enjoyed landing. This was followed by some time out of the midday heat, enjoying a couple of well earned G&T’s and a dip in the pool before the afternoon session.

Mike with another great 3 sport bream on fly for the season

Mike with another great 3 sport bream on fly for the season

On the last full day of fishing the guides stumbled upon some good runs downstream of the lodge where the tigers were feeding furiously on the surface, chasing and smashing the fleeing baitfish.  The action was explosive and very visual as Jem and Ken got smashed on just about every cast.  During the carnage, both anglers landed some very good tigerfish, up to 7 lbs, as well as a whopping thin-face largemouth of 5 lbs.  This great session was a fitting end to a great trip with a super bunch of guys.  We headed back to the lodge for dinner and a solid fines evening ensued,  where both guides and guests were  made to “pay” for their misfortunes during the week.  Needless to say everyone had a good time during a week filled with good company, good food and good fishing.

Tigerfish double up action with Ken and Anton

Tigerfish double up action with Ken and Anton

See you on the water.

Pierre, Lionel and Kyle.

Jeremy admiring his thin-face largemouth

Jeremy admiring his thin-face largemouth

Sep 18

First couple days of chasing poons in Coast Rica. Some tough sessions, but things are looking up.

Cold beers after fighting big tarpon, Costa Rica

Cold beers after fighting big tarpon, Costa Rica

I’m sitting enjoying a cold Imperial Beer, one of Costa Rica’s finest lagers and it is GOOD. For the past two days we have really struggled, but finally it all came together this afternoon making this cold beer taste all the sweeter. In short, during the afternoon session between the 4 boats we jumped upwards of 16 fish as well as boating 2 tarpon and a number of good sized jacks. It was session of large schools of poons smashing baitballs on the surface. A adrenaline filled couple of hours, including some experiences that will stay with us for many years to come.

The two days leading up to this session have been the polar opposite, the weather has been up and down, leading to a sea that has been choppy with very little signs of tarpon. For these first few sessions we really toiled, and on occasions we would go for an hour or so without even seeing a tarpon roll.

Tarpon Scales, Costa Rica

Tarpon Scales, Costa Rica

The upside of these tough sessions was it showed the real grit of the guys in this group, as everyone stuck to their guns, focused , and fished hard through these tough sessions. As hard as they were, we still managed to get a couple good fish it the boat, most notably a fish of roughly 150lb landed by Karl.

With this afternoons session under the belt, the forecast looking good, the beers cold, the tarpon starting to feed, we should be in for some really exciting fishing these next few days. I am sure the report I put up tomorrow will be pretty exciting, so watch this space.

 

Sep 16

Okavango Tigerfish Season Week 2: 8 – 13 Sept 2014

The next group of anglers consisting of Graham, Ewan, Roberto, Alessandro, Steven and Duncan arrived at camp full of anticipation and eager to start fishing.  Some members of the party were return guests, so expectations were high and the pressure was on.   With the warm weather setting in, and the runs intensifying, the group of 6 anglers were ready to tackle the tigerfish.  The fishing was not easy though, and the grouped worked hard for their strikes. As always, patience is the key and pretty soon everyone was on the board landing some nice fish.  Drifting with the current and casting flies into likely looking lies proved to be very effective, and fishing off the sand banks produced some good fish when the runs were not at their best.

Steve and Graham cruising with Lionel as the sun sets on the Okavango

Steve and Graham cruising with Lionel as the sun sets on the Okavango

The water level of the Okavango river is dropping steadily and the temperature rising each day. Resulting in the barbell marauding hoards of baitfish out of the papyrus into the main channel where the tigerfish wait in ambush.   The frequent sightings of hippos, crocs, fish eagles, kingfishers, marabou storks and other wildlife kept everyone entertained during the boat drives up and down the river, offering the budding photographers in the group many opportunities to capture that perfect piece of wild Africa.

Sandro with a great 7lb fish

Sandro with a great 7lb fish

The highlight of the week was the last few sessions of the trip when the guides took a gamble to explore some areas south of where they had been fishing. They were fortunate to find some massive runs, and have them all to themselves.

Ewan and Steve enjoying their 6th 'double'

Ewan and Steve enjoying their 6th ‘double’

As is the case in these scenarios, chaos erupted. Line burns, broken rods, popped leaders, lost fish and broken spirits were experienced, but the anglers pushed on without ever giving up. Through all the carnage, some great fish (tigerfish, nemwbe and bream) were landed, and the experience will not soon be forgotten.  The last day produced some 107 odd fish between 6 anglers.

Steve showing off some "Okavango Emerald" with a beautiful Nembwe

Steve showing off some “Okavango Emerald” with a beautiful Nembwe

Roberto and Alessandro landed a 9 lb tiger each and Duncan landed a very nice three-spot bream of 6 lbs which fell to a fire-tiger clouser.  The week could not get any better and with a setting sun we headed back to the lodge for the final dinner.  Duncan had a score to settle with some of the fish he lost during the day  so we stopped at the mouth of a lagoon where some fleeing baitfish were observed for ‘one last cast’. Following a good cast in the right area Duncan hooked and landed a super 7lb tiger that eluded him during the week. It was the perfect end to a super 4 days on the water and we could not have asked for more.

Roberto with a well earned 9lb tigerfish

Roberto with a well earned 9lb tigerfish

The fishing is looking very promising for the next couple of weeks and we are looking forward to welcome the next group of fanatic anglers into camp.

Tired anglers taking a rest mid way through a 100+ fish day

Tired anglers taking a rest mid way through a 100+ fish day

See you on the river.

The Okavango guides team:  Kyle, Lionel and Pierre.

G&T sundowners... a firm favorite on the Okavango

G&T sundowners… a firm favorite on the Okavango

Sep 15

Tanzania Tigerfish Week 1: 6 – 13 Sept 2014

The first group of the 2014 season in Tanzania consisted of three friends from Brazil. Celso, Pedro and Aline. Our guests arrived on the 6th of Sept, a late start to the season which generally gets under way in Mid August. Unfortunately late season rains had kept both rivers high and cold. The Mnyera in particular was showing no signs of dropping as is traditionally the case at this time of year. Regardless of the potential difficult fishing conditions, fish we must, and so we took to the water as soon as the guests were settled in.

Day one and two were spent peppering the banks of the Mnyera, and although all our guests made a valiant effort, few fish made it into the boat. After the first day of intermittent drizzle, and a second day of similar conditions, catches were scarce.  Celso  managed to land 4 fish ranging from 3lbs to 8lbs, which was good going considering the conditions. Apart from Celso’s few fish, and several halfhearted attempts of tigers trying to eat Pedro’s and Alines flies, it was time to face the fact that the Mnyera was not going to improve in the next couple of days, and the seemingly lethargic tiger fish in this river were not getting any closer to the hungry and aggressive tigerfish we all know. The decision to leave the Mnyera and head over to the Ruhudji a day early was made.

Pedro with a healthy 12lb tigerfish

Pedro with a healthy 12lb tigerfish

On departure to the Ruhudji the immediate concern was not of the conditions of the river, but the state of the newly opened road to get us to camp. After the unseasonable rains of the last few weeks our  worst fears came to light. The wet black cotton clay sunk its soft claws into the landcruiser bogging us down numerous times. Armed with a machete and axe, we ‘deforested’ the immediate area and pushed on  through the black porridge that was once a road beneath the vehicle. After much sweat and hard graft we eventually got the tired but eager guests to the Ruhudji river camp.

Saturated black cotton clay soil making the standard 1hr45 drive between camps a serious 7hr adventure!

Saturated black cotton clay soil making the standard 1hr45 drive between camps a serious 7hr adventure!

With not much daylight left, the guys (and girl) did well on their first session on the Ruhudji. There were a number of considerably more aggressive hits and Pedro landed a beautiful 12lb fish. The scene was set for a much better 2nd half of the trip.
With a new day and newly formed eagerness we headed to the upper Ruhudji. With true upper Ruhudji form guests were rewarded with some excellent fishing. Celso quickly landed a nice 11lb fish and connected with 5 more fish well over 17lbs, one in particular big fish launching itself right over the front of the boat and was estimated at over 20 lbs. The fishing was back on!

Aline  and guide Mark Murray proudly display a massive Tanzania tigerfish. This 18lb fish was taken on the Ruhudji river on a black&white brush fly. On the initial take it ran screaming down stream into the backing in a matter of seconds.

Aline and guide Mark Murray proudly display a massive Tanzania tigerfish. This 18lb fish was taken on the Ruhudji river on a black&white brush fly. On the initial take it ran screaming down stream into the backing in a matter of seconds.

The last two full days of the trip were spent on the middle and lower Ruhudji where some interesting and exciting fishing took place, with many more big fish hook-ups keeping the guys on their toes. Pedro got himself another nice 12 pound fish, and Celso an 11 pounder. The star of the week however was Aline and her “take everything and give nothing back” approach to fighting trophy tigerfish. Aline did superbly well to land  a massive 18lb fish, that at first glance looked way over 20lbs. All the tigerfish were in mint condition, fat and healthy, which bodes very well for the rest of the season!

This pic of a black velvet (caught by Jeff Currier 2010) nymphing in the rapids shows the size we have found them up to now.

This pic of a black velvet (caught by Jeff Currier 2010) nymphing in the rapids shows the size we have found them up to now.

 

Last, but not least, one of the highlights of the week came when Celso hooked up with what was thought to be a big tigerfish. However, on its first roll it turned out to be something quite different! Previous seasons in the Kasingo rapids we have experienced some unique fly-fishing for local yellowfish species. One of these species is relatively unknown in the ichthyology field,and has been dubbed the  “black velvet” by the guides, due to the beautiful mauve and black tinges on margins of its scales and fins. Originally we thought these fish maxed out at about 3lbs. Celso’s catch has changed everything. After a long and loud fight, Celso landed a huge 9.5lb black velvet which surprisingly ate a blue and black deerhair pattern, thus concluding a challenging yet enjoyable week.

TF Guide Stuart Harley and Celso Spinelli with a 9,5lbs yellowfish taken on a blue & black deerhair pattern while fishing for tigerfish.

TF Guide Stuart Harley and Celso Spinelli with a 9,5lbs yellowfish taken on a blue & black deerhair pattern while fishing for tigerfish.

A big thanks to Pedro, Aline and Celso  for their relentless effort and patience in tough conditions,  and well done on all your excellent fish.

Cheers for now

Andrew and the TF Guides Crew (Mark, Greg and Stu)

Sep 11

Okavango Tigerfish Season Week 1: 3 – 7 Sept 2014

Releasing the first tigerfish of the season

Releasing the first tigerfish of the season

The Barbel Run Season on the Okavango River, Botswana kicked off with a false start  as we arrived in camp to discover that the boat and jetty were trapped by a huge floating papyrus island. A channel had to be hacked through the obstruction before we could get onto the river to do some pre season exploring.  Luckily help was at hand and very soon we were en route to find the birds and smash a few tigerfish.  We fished around a few small runs where barbel and egrets were feeding on the fleeing baitfish. We also drifted the boat midstream and casting to the banks where both Kyle and myself landed a few more fish on the first afternoon before we had to get back to work with final preparations to the  boats and tackle before the first group of the season arrived.

Pierre enjoying some time on the water before the start of a busy guiding season

Pierre enjoying some time on the water before the start of a busy guiding season

The first group of the season arrived full of anticipation, eager to catch that fish of a lifetime.  The group consisted of Kyle’s father Rob, who flew in from George, Shaun, Twiggy, Robin, Manny and Bruce who all drove in from Johannesburg.  After a short briefing and tackle check everyone was on their boat and the guides were ready to get the anglers into some tigerfish action.

Mega-Drift Sundownwers

The “Mega-Drift” Sundowners

Twiggy nearly became crocodile food when he lost his balance and fell off the boat, but Kyle was close by and before he knew what happened Twiggy was back in the boat moving lightning fast to get out of the croc infested water.  Things could have been serious but no harm no foul and the guys were cracking jokes over some well deserved beers all afternoon.

The water level was high and the river still cool after the long winter, and brutal cold front, but the fish were there and not shy to take a well presented fly.  The fishing was not easy and everyone had to work hard to get a hook-up but patience was rewarded when Robin caught a super 7 lb Tiger on the first day.  Everyone was still tired after the long drive so we headed for the comfort of the lodge just as the sun was setting over the Okavango River so that the guys can have a good rest and be ready for the following days fishing.

Robin with a solid 7lb tigerfish

Robin with a solid 7lb tigerfish

The next day everyone was well rested and ready to tackle the tigerfish.  Manny landed a good size Nembwe while Shaun had a field day when we came across large run on a channel linked to the main river.  The tigerfish were smashing small baitfish all over the place and the fishing were frantic for the next 20 minutes .  Shaun managed to land 8 Tigerfish out of the channel all fish weighing in at 4 – 6 lbs and Bruce landed his first tigerfish on fly in a small lagoon just off the main river.

Manny shows off the beautiful colours of a nembwe

Manny shows off the beautiful colours of a nembwe

After struggling to get a good fish to eat his fly, Manny landed the best fish of the trip on the last day.  A whopping 8 lb Tiger that sealed the deal and gave him honours around the camp fire that evening.

Manny finished off with a super 8lb fish

Manny finished off with a super 8lb fish

Saturday afternoon was spent watching the Rugby and having great pizza  before we headed out for one last session on the river which marked the end of a tough but productive three days on the water.

Rob proving that fishing is the family genes, with a great fish

Rob proving that fishing is the family genes, with a great fish

Early season on any water can be very finicky and waiting for the fishing to come on can be tiring at times, but that is how it is with fishing.

Some thin-faced-large-mouth action

Some thin-faced-large-mouth action

Personally, it was a great start to the Okavango guiding season.  The experience was everything I could ever imagine and I am looking forward to guiding the rest of the season.

See you on the Okavango!

Pierre and  the TF Okavango Guides Team

Kyle, Lionel and Pierre.

Okavango River Sunset

Okavango River Sunset

Sep 01

#nubianflats – check out this video from the last few weeks of exploring on the Nubian Flats

Aug 06

Meet Tourette Fishing’s travel and product development specialist, Ed Truter

IMG_3863EDWARD DEREK TRUTER

DOB - 15 June 1973

NATIONALITY – South African

HOME TOWN - Port Alfred 

 

 

 

 

Ed grew up on a small farm near Port Alfred. His father is an outdoorsman through and through so he had no choice in the early alignment of his interests. From the youngest age he had a curiosity to explore. It began with the little streams around the farm and now he still does the same thing, it’s just that the water is a bit further from the front door.

 

Travel log

Lesotho, Namibia, Botswana, Swaziland, Mozambique, Zimbabwe, Zambia, Tanzania, Malawi, Kenya, Angola, Gabon, Sao Tome & Principe, Togo, Ghana, Ivory Coast, Burkina Faso, Niger, Mali, Senegal, Madagascar, Congo, Democratic Republic of Congo, Sudan, India, Newfoundland, Ontario, British Columbia, Florida, Alaska, Mexico, Chile, Argentina, Brazil, Australia, New Zealand, French Polynesia, Cook Islands, Niue, Tonga, Bahamas, U.K.

 

Q & A WITH THE MAN HIMSELF

What was your first fly rod?

It was a Fenwick glass rod that my dad built for me when I was twelve, a 7wt I think. It was yellow and slow but it served me well until my German shorthaired pointer ate it.

 

Where is your favorite fishing spot?

I can’t answer that. I mean I don’t know how to. I like to be in wild places, in the mountains. Lesotho is special for me, as is the Baviaanskloof in the Eastern Cape, and any place that I might wade for big bonefish. I lived in Gabon for a while, and that’s somewhere else that will always be close to my heart.

 

What would you consider to be your favorite fly?

Huh? Really! Any decent fly for the job on the day and that’s tied with what I call ‘magic materials’ (materials that make fish just eat). I dig the Dahlberg Diver tied the way Larry ties it. Zak variants are a favourite too, and the DDD. Of course I can’t leave out the chartreuse over white Clouser and there is one other fly, the little known, but it-should-be-banned, Mud Monkey.

 

What is your all time favorite movie? 

Crocodile Dundee (Mick is my hero) with other highlights being Searching for Sugarman and The Game (1997 with Michael Douglas). On the fishing-film side, Redmire Legends; it’s about carp fishing and it is truly masterful film making in every way.

 

What kind of books do you like?

Non-fiction (though Pride and Prejudice is an all-time favourite). Travel short-story anthologies like Batfishing in the Rainforest by Randy Wayne White. I also enjoy biographies and especially those on explorers like Capt. Cook or about other folks that were a bit off the wall and lived and behaved along the fringes of the human herd. There are times though when I just read field guides.

 

What kind of music are you into? 

Birdsong. I don’t have a beatbox in my house or a TV. I mostly like quiet, and birdsong. But I do appreciate clever lyrics; Jack Parow for example, he has some skerp lyrics.

 

Any advice you would give to someone starting out fly fishing?

If you are not a scientist at heart, try to learn to think like one. One way to be a good angler is to practice basic science: observe – hypothesise – test. Observe everything and its interconnectedness in your surroundings, devise a hypothesis against your knowledge base, then test your idea. The biggest breakthroughs mostly come via observations of very subtle differences. Listen to what Nature is telling you. Don’t do the same thing for more than three casts without a strike. Share self-experienced knowledge with good people and they will share alike, and as hard as it may be, try not to swing your dick.

 

Any interests outside of fishing?

I have an interest in all natural history, and a strange preoccupation with African politics, probably because the latter are so laughable, sadly. I also hunt, camp, hike, and all that stuff, and I like to write about some of the things I do. I really like fishes and fishing though.

 

Favourite Quotes?

“The phone is your friend” – Gary Kinder from Ship of Gold in the Deep Blue Sea (remember, somewhere on the end of a phone is someone who knows more than you do, don’t be shy to call and ask)

“The two best times to go fishing are when it’s raining and when it aint” – Patrick F. Mcmanus

“The dogs may bark, but his caravan rolls on” – Unknown

 

Most Memorable moment/highlight of your career?

Island hopping across the South Pacific in a 32’ yacht just to go fishing.

IMG_1351-EditIMG_3776IMG_1296

Jul 31

Meet Tourette Fishing Guide, Lionel Song

LSOng1LIONEL SONG

DOB – 28 July 1966

NATIONALITY - South Africa

HOMETOWN - Pietersburg

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lionel started guiding in 1988 after leaving the army. He guided in the Timbavati for two years and then ran walking trails in the Manyeleti for another two years before working in the Klaserie. Lionel later moved to Botswana to run Lloyd’s Camp in the Savuti for six years and from there to doing lodge relief management. During the latter time his love for fly fishing was ignited, and the flame has burned ever since. Lionel moved to the KZN Midlands in the late 90’s. In-between all of the above did some freelance fly fishing guiding, and also spent time developing a lodge in Gabon. There he met his guru, Sir Edward Truter. Lionel’s involvement with Tourette Fishing was a fortuitous meeting with TF director, Keith Clover, on the Zambezi some years back. Lionel sums this up bests in his own words: “I met Keith Clover under intimate circumstances on a small island on the Zambezi, in a small wooden hut. We shared a few sweaty nights together as the weather was rather warm. Our relationship (make that friendship) was rather infectious (no, there were no diseases), from the start as we shared not only that steamy little hut, but the same sense of humor as well. After an amazing twelve years of camaraderie and hilarious capers, from amazing fishing to cavorting crocodiles here we still are, thrilling our clients and enjoying every rollicking minute of it.”

 

Guiding Log

Botswana Fishing and Safari Guiding: 1988 – Present

Lesotho: 2013-2014

 

Q & A WITH THE MAN HIMSELF

What was your first fly rod?

Diawa Osprey

 

Where is your favorite fishing spot?

Gabon

 

What would you consider to be your favorite fly?

Clousers and any fly tied with natural materials.

 

What is your all time favorite movie?

 Apocalypse Now

 

What kind of music are you into?

AC/DC

 

What kind of books do you like?

The Earth is Not Enough – Harry Middleton

The River Why – David James Duncan

Somewhere Down the Crazy River – Jeremy Wade & John Boote

Fish Fishing and The Meaning of Life – Jeremy Paxman

 

Any advice you would give to someone starting out fly fishing?

Persevere. You will eventually stop catching the bush behind you.

 

Any interests outside of fishing?

WWW (wildlife, whisky, women).

 

Favorite quote?

War is Gods way of teaching Americans geography- Ambrose Bierce

 

Most memorable moment or highlight of your guiding career?

I had a lady client on my boat in the Okavango who managed to land a 16lb tigerfish while her husband looked on. I really enjoyed that.

IMG_6253catfish

Jul 24

Meet Tourette Fishing Guide, Kyle Reed

s24KYLE REED

DOB - 11 February 1988

NATIONALITY – South Africa 

HOMETOWN - George

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Kyle grew up in the picturesque Garden Route part of the Southern Cape in South Africa. George is surrounded by plenty of rivers and dams with abundant fishes. Fishing is part of the local lifestyle so it was natural that Kyle ended up fly fishing at a young age. Kyle has also completed a diploma in Professional Photography. He joined the Tourette Fishing team in 2012.

 

Guiding log

Botswana: 2012, 2013, 2014

Farquhar: 2012, 2013, 2014

Lesotho: 2014

 

Q & A WITH THE MAN HIMSELF

What was your first fly rod?

My first fly rod was a 4wt Loomis & Franklin, matched with a silver aluminium reel and a crummy line. It made for immensely tricky casting until I invested in a better quality line. However, I did catch my first garrick on the setup.

 

Where is your favorite fishing spot?

It will have to be the sneaky flat I have on the Swartvlei estuary. MANY grunter!

 

What would you consider to be your favorite fly?

My favorite fly is obviously location specific but if I had to travel the world with only one fly, it would have to be a Clouser of sorts.

 

What is your all time favorite movie? 

That’s a tricky one. When it comes to fly fishing media, I have watched hundreds of movies over and again. Tapam and Gangsters of the flats are my two favorites.

 

What kind of music are you into? 

Music, as with film is just as tricky. I’m pretty open-minded though and will listen to anything from hip-hop to techno. The album that’s on repeat on my iPod at the moment is Concrete School Yard by Jurassic 5.

 

Any advice you would give to someone starting out fly fishing?

The best advice I was given when starting out was to never stop casting. Practice all the time. Even if you don’t have a rod close-by, just use your hands. Like in the shower or in the office at work for instance you can teach your body to get used to hauling by mimicking with your hands. Also, practice casting into the wind and try to hit targets with your tippet. Don’t only practice distance casting because when you have to hit a target the size of a side plate with a big crab pattern into the wind, the wheels will come off.

 

Any interests outside of fishing?

Photography, camping, the Kruger National Park, and working on my boat.

 

Favorite quote?

“I believe that art is, and cannot be other than, the exact reproduction of nature. Thus an industry that could give us a result identical to nature, would be absolute art” - Charles Baudelaire (on nature photography)

 

Most memorable moment or highlight of your guiding career?

This is a tough one as there are so many good memories. Right at the top of the list would have to be when my dad came to visit in Botswana and I guided him onto his first tigerfish. Also the one afternoon I fished with Keith Clover and Lionel Song in the Okavango. We jumped so many big fish and in between all the chaos, I managed a whopping 8.5lb tiger. Some other really good memories that come to mind as well would be the first GT and permit that I guided clients into.IMG_0225Kyle Reed, Okavango 23-30 September 2013 (4)-Edit

kyle5

Jul 18

Meet Tourette Fishing Guide, Stuart Harley

Stue1
STUART HARLEY

DOB - 31 August 1990

NATIONALITY - South Africa  

HOME TOWN - Howick

 

 

 

 

Stuart was born, raised, and schooled in the KZN midlands. A really passionate outdoorsman, Stuart spent all his free time during his teens, either fishing or hunting. After matriculating, Stuart did his professional hunting apprenticeship in Mozambique where he worked for two years. He spent all his time in between hunting safaris, fishing the southern banks of the Cahora Bassa dam and fell in love with the tigerfish that dogged its shallows. He found himself fishing for these toothy predators more than anything else and decided to follow his passion for them by guiding full time on the lower Zambezi.

Stuart joined the Tourette Fishing team in 2014 full time.

 

Guiding log

Lower Zambezi: 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

Lesotho: 2014

 

Q & A WITH THE MAN HIMSELF

What was your first fly rod?

Ecotec 8’ 4wt

 

Where is your favorite fishing spot?

Kariba Gorge

 

What would you consider to be your favorite fly?

Mberi SF baitfish

 

What is your all time favorite movie?

A Million Ways To Die In The West starring Seth MacFarlane, Charlize Theron, and Liam Neeson.

 

What kind of music are you into? 

I really enjoy listening to deep house, sax, and I’m also into acoustic. However, the sound of a screaming reel and an angler going ballistic, is real music to my ears.

 

Any advice you would give to someone starting out fly fishing?

Never under any circumstance, stop having fun. Plus always strive to learn new things.

 

Any interests outside of fishing?

I’m an outdoors man. I love to spend time exploring the african bush and everything that comes with it. Photography is also something I am quite passionate about.

 

Favorite quote?

“Why not?” - Unknown

 

Most memorable moment or highlight of your guiding career?

I have been fortunate to share countless special moments with many people. To me, all of those moments are just as memorable as the other.

stue3

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